Elephant Calf Chasing Warthog - 2019

Bronze, Signed Hamish Mackie, Numbered Edition of 12, Dated 2019
6,600 Inc. VAT
47cm long x 18cm high x 16cm wide / 18.5" x 7" x 6"
Sculptures can be shipped world wide at cost, no VAT payable on exports outside the EU.

Hamish has been studying elephants in the wild for more than twenty-five years. In this series of four sculptures - Elephant Calf Bold, Elephant Calf BoisterousElephant Calf Bashful and Elephant Calf Chasing Warthog - he brings his sculptor's eye to the younger members of the herd.

"Elephants are a subject I will never tire of. I find elephants have a complex and varied range of emotions and are fairly easy to read." (HM)

Here, the elephant calf is chasing off a warthog. Hamish observed the orphaned elephant calves at Reteti elephant sanctuary in Northern Kenya, growing in confidence as they are cared for and finding their feet. Nearby at Lewa Wildlife Conservancy, the younger elephants are similarly relaxed. Perhaps they somehow know that in both these conservation havens, they are safe from human-wildlife conflict within the security boundaries.

Hamish will quite often sculpt several of the same subject at the same time. It is a very dynamic and efficient way of sculpting, as he really gets his subject in his head. Each of these elephant calf sculptures has a powerful emotional impact and when placed together, they make a compelling scene.

Click on the main image to zoom into the picture.

THIS SCULPTURE IN THE MAKING

African elephant in wild
Hamish observing elephant in landcover
warthogs in the wild

I have spent enough happy hours studying elephant from the back of a landcover in Laikipia, northern Kenya, to know that an elephant calf is potentially one of the most playful creatures on the planet. Whether it is splashing about in water, playing helicopters with its trunk or charging away any thing that moves! Warthogs also have a comical 'radio-controlled car’ look about them as they run with raised 'aerial’ tails. Combine the two and this makes a light hearted scene that many of us who are lucky enough to have visited Africa will have witnessed.